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Home > News & Media > The NAA Blog

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NAA Blog

Latest Posts

How journalists can improve their health news stories

By CATHERINE PAYNE
August 20, 2014

Saccharine coverage of health care topics not only leaves a bad taste in the mouths of some people. It also raises concerns.

Many news stories exaggerate potential benefits and minimize possible harms of new health care interventions, according to the article "A Guide to Reading Health Care News Stories." The article was posted online in May and appeared in the July issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CrowdSource events develop a new revenue stream for The Dallas Morning News

By SEAN O'LEARY
August 18, 2014

Events have always relied on the power of a newspaper’s audience to boost attendance and increase revenue.

But what if the newspaper could leverage that built-in audience to build up its own events?

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NAA Roundup: Statesman Journal names new publisher; PolitiFact Florida expands to newspapers statewide

By SEAN O'LEARY
August 15, 2014

Gannett Co., Inc. announced that Terry Horne has been named president and publisher of the Statesman Journal in Salem, OR. In addition, Horne will become regional president of Gannett West/Interstate Group. Horne comes to the Statesman Journal after as president and publisher of the Pensacola (FL) News Journal.

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Four tips for math- and finance-phobic journalists

By MARY ELLEN BIERY
August 14, 2014

There's a reason the Investigative Reporters & Editors website has a tipsheet titled "Math, Your Friend."

Let's face it: Many of us sucked at math in school and avoided it when possible in college. I kept a sticky note on my computer to show me how to calculate percent change, so I feel your pain if you struggle with stories laden with numbers or panic at the thought of having to analyze a major company's earnings and write about its performance.

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The State of Local Programmatic: 100 Local Media Execs Weigh In

By AMBER BENSON
August 13, 2014

There is no denying the gap between publishers that want to take advantage of targeted solutions and fully integrated cross-platform programs, and local advertisers who faithfully hold to their knowledge of their buyers and what’s worked before. What is interesting is just how wide that gap is and how best to bridge it.

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Five Answers with Keven Ann Willey, Dallas Morning News

By SEAN O'LEARY
August 11, 2014

1) What drew you to working in newspaper media?

I went into college as an English Lit major wanting to write the Great American Novel. The faculty adviser at freshman orientation was a journalism professor and listening to him I began to think writing about current events would be fun. (I could always write the Great American Novel later, right?) In those days the only options in MassComm were newspapers, TV-radio or PR-advertising tracks.

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NAA Roundup: Gannett spins off publishing; Tribune Publishing announces 5-year deal with Cars.com

By SEAN O'LEARY
August 8, 2014

On Tuesday, Gannett Co., Inc. announced its plan to create two publicly traded companies with scale: one exclusively focused on its Broadcasting and Digital businesses, and the other on its Publishing business. The planned separation of the Publishing business will be implemented through a tax-free distribution of Gannett’s Publishing assets to shareholders. The transaction will create two focused companies with increased opportunities to grow organically across all businesses as well as pursue strategic acquisitions.

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Five Answers with Kerry Oslund, Schurz Communications

By SEAN O'LEARY
August 5, 2014

1) What drew you to working in newspaper media?

A sense that I can help my company and teammates with further transformation, innovation and entrepreneurial efforts.

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Political cartoonist sketches out her own path in digital age

By CATHERINE PAYNE
August 4, 2014

Political cartoonists are powerful storytellers who can provoke anger and laughter with a few words and images, but their story is less told.

NAA caught up with award-winning political cartoonist Jen Sorensen to get a peek at her experience in the digital age.

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Quiz on novels by journalists

By CATHERINE PAYNE
July 28, 2014

Many journalists have used their reporting and writing skills to craft novels that enchant and challenge. They have enabled us to explore their imagination and our own conscience, often at the same time. Do you remember the fictional stories written by Charles Dickens, Ernest Hemingway and other journalists?

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NAA Roundup: Providence Journal sold, Houston Chronicle relocating

By SEAN O'LEARY
July 25, 2014

New Media Investment Group Inc. announced this week it has reached an agreement to purchase The Providence Journal and related print and digital assets for $46.0 million in cash from A. H. Belo Corporation. The Providence Journal is one of the oldest print publications in the United States and was first published in 1829. It has a daily circulation of approximately 72,000 and 96,000 on Sunday.

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Five Answers with Matt Pittman, Florida Times-Union

By SEAN O'LEARY
July 23, 2014

1) What drew you to working in newspaper media?

My answer is probably a lot different than most. I was drawn to work in newspaper media, because The Florida Times-Union had a fun new idea. Luckily for me, the President of the company had me in mind to be the face of the new project: personality driven videos.

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Quiz on newspaper comic strips

By CATHERINE PAYNE
July 21, 2014

Since the late 19th century, U.S. newspapers' funny pages have tickled readers' funny bones. They have been a bright spot amid pages filled with stories about crime, political wrangling and war. NAA put together a fun quiz on comic strips' zany characters, running gags and more.

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Ramen Noodles Theory of online news is still food for thought

By CATHERINE PAYNE
July 15, 2014

Journalists might have gotten a taste of the Ramen Noodles Theory years ago. The theory, which suggests that online news, like ramen noodles, is an inferior good, might have been hard for some to swallow, but it is still interesting food for thought.

Iris Chyi, an associate professor in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin, said her theory hasn't really changed over the years. She answered NAA's questions via email about how newspapers can use her findings.

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Quiz on acronyms and initialisms heard in newsrooms

By CATHERINE PAYNE
July 14, 2014

How well do you remember what journalists' abbreviations stand for? NAA put together a quick quiz.

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NAA Roundup: New publisher for Ventura County Star; Gannett buys six TV stations

By SEAN O'LEARY
July 11, 2014

The E.W. Scripps Company has promoted Shanna Cannon, a newspaper executive with more than 20 years of experience, to regional publisher of the Ventura County (California) Star, effective immediately.

She steps up to a larger-circulation newspaper from her role as publisher of the Scripps-owned Record Searchlight in Redding, California. During her tenure in Redding, the newspaper earned numerous state and national awards in newswriting and photography.

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The Washington Times gives back to the community with news racks

By SEAN O'LEARY
July 9, 2014

The Washington Times had hundreds of extra news racks lying around with few options for their continued use. There did not appear to be many alternate uses for a news rack.

Or so it would seem, because Doug Alexander, president of the Newspaper in Education Institute and educational services manager of the Washington Times had an idea – repurposing Washington Times news racks as Little Free Libraries where he lives in Cheverly, Maryland.

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Five Answers with Mi-Ai Parrish, Kansas City Star

By SEAN O'LEARY
July 8, 2014

1) What drew you to working in newspaper media?

My first week in college, a new friend asked me to go with her to the newspaper cattle call. We had seen an ad in the campus daily looking for cub reporters, but she was too shy to go by herself. We both ended up changing our majors, mine to journalism and hers to speech pathology. I’d been the high school yearbook editor, a photographer, and an avid Washington Post reader as a teenager, but hadn’t considered journalism as a career. I caught the bug that first day with my first byline.

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